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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  February 10, 2015 9:00am-10:01am EST

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this is bbc america. now, live from london, "bbc world news." hello, this is "bbc world news," the top stories. president assad tells the bbc his government has information from the americans in the war against islamic state. >> there's a formation. they tell you things. >> do you tell them things? >> no. >> the former head of the international monetary fund tells the french court no crime as he gives evidence in pimping charges.
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>> babies switched at birth are awarded 2 million euros in compensation. hello, a very warm welcome to you. we begin in syria. president assad insisted his country is not a failed state. speaking exclusively to the bbc, he admitted his government is receiving communication from the u.s. coalition against the islamic state. he bears no responsibility to the humanitarian crisis engulfing parts of his country as they enter their fifth year. an estimated 200,000 people lost their lives. more than 9 million forced from their homes, many to refugee camps in neighboring countries.
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well documented evidence as barrel bombs have been dropped on rebel held areas. in an interview, president assad denies uses forces. cities and homes have been reduced to ruins. president al assad was speaking to bbc. >> president, you have lost control of large areas of syria. the jihadist group, islamic state emerged. 200,000 syrians are dead many lost their homes. they call it the most serious humanitarian crisis since the second world war. has syria become a failed state? >> no as long as the government and state are fulfilling the need for the syrian people cannot talk failure states.
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talking about losing control is something completely different. it's like if you have invasion of terrorists coming from abroad and the government is doing the job and fighting and defending its country. >> i have spent time on the front line with soldiers from the syrian army who insisted they were patriots. they weren't cold-blooded killers. i have interviewed other people and they say they have suffered badly at the hand of syrian soldiers. they can't all have been lying, surely. >> how? how surely? why are you sure? >> because the testimony of human rights. january of this year they said forces have deliberately attacked civilians using weapons.
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>> this is childish. >> childish? >> why? >> somebody against these people and against the region of power and the great power in the west. >> what about barrel bombs? you don't deny your forces use them? >> the army uses bullets and bombs. i haven't heard of them using that. >> large barrels full of explosives and projectiles that are dropped from helicopters and explode with heavy death. >> we have bombs, missiles and bullets. >> on the fight against islamic state and al qaeda, the u.s. and others said you cannot be a partner in that fight. would you like to be a partner? >> partner with who? >> with the countries attacking the islamic state at the moment. >> definitely cannot. we cannot be aligned with a
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country that supports terrorism. >> there are american planes in the air above syria all the time. do you coordinate? >> no. they don't talk to anyone. and they trumpet over the international law about our sovereignty now. >> i'm curious, is there a time when the american military is in the air above syria and your air force, the syrian air force is in the air. there haven't been incidents between the two. no shot seems to have been traded. no planes shot down. that suggests to me surely -- >> that's correct. again, there's no direct cooperation. >> direct. is it by iraq? that's what some said? >> third party. more than one party. sometimes they contain a message. nothing tactical. >> you can see the full
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interview with president assad here on bbc at 16:30. i'll talk to a member of the syrian opposition in ten minutes as well. stay with us for that. the former head of the international monetary fund started to give evidence at a trial in france. he faces charges of aggravated pimping. he's holding women for sex parties for a prostitution ring. he can't admit he attended the parties, but did know the women were being paid. he's among 13 people accused. we are at the trial. >> reporter: yes, this is a packed room at the courthouse. dominique strauss-khan has taken the stand briefly. he answered a few questions in a low voice, a solemn presence in
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the courtroom in his black suit. he answered questions about one of his co-accused. he's alleged to have helped organize the sex parties that dominic strauss-khan is answering questions about. he describes him as his main contact within the group and said he was a real friend to him. he was there when his mother died. described the friendship as an important one. they met 12 times in three years. he was giving basic details about the relationship with the other co-accused. >> he was head of the imf, international monetary fund. he was picked to be the next president of france. this is a fall from grace, isn't it? a reminder of what he's been accused of. prostitution is not, in and of its, illegal. >> reporter: yes, it's certainly not where dominique strauss-khan thought he would be a few years
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ago. he was supposed to be france's next president until a previous sex scandal broke in 2011. he now finds himself here again with the french press and the international press upon him, all eyes watching as he tries to defend himself of the latest allegations. what he's accused of, it's not just prostitutes. that's not illegal in france. procuring sex work is illegal. he's facing a charge of aggravated procurement. he was involved in procuring sex workers for parties that took place in france and also in washington during his time as head of the imf. >> india's prime minister is set for a defeat in delegations. it's a major set back from the
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last elections only nine months ago. we are in delhi where supporters are celebrating. >> reporter: there's nowhere in the city you can see than where i am right now. outside the headquarters of the party of the center of it all. the big tv screen behind me. the numbers keep flashing up on the screen. if it continues this way, the party would have won almost every single seat up for grabs. even they can't quite comprehend the scale of the victory. they spoke to supporters a short while ago and described the mandate as a scary one. just eight months ago, he won every single parliament in new delhi. he was seen as a man who gets things done a man of action. eight months in they think he's still great and have his act together. they have shown how unforgiving
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they can be. >> it marks a major comeback for him and the anti-corruption ap party. >> reporter: it is. it's a stunning comeback. he was the head of a major anti-corruption drive a few years ago. just over a year ago, after the last election he formed a minority government in new delhi. he left after 49 days. a widely discredited figure. he held protests outside the office of the federal government building. he went head-to-head in the parliamentary election and was defeated soundly. just a few weeks ago, no one would have imagined quite a turn around. he poised not just to win, but win a historic and decisive victory. now two french families whose babies were switched at birth more than 20 years ago
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have been awarded almost 2 million euros. it happened after they were put in incubators together. they discovered that she and her husband were not the biological parents of their daughter. an investigation was held and the other couple traced. we have been following the story. >> reporter: you say it goes back 20 years to this clinic on the mediterranean coast. the two newborn babies required early natal treatment. one we know had drawn this. she was put in an incubator given ultra violent light. another baby at exactly the same time was receiving the same treatment. when it came to taking the babies out, there was a mix up.
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she went home with the other chide, not the one she had given birth to. >> the girl seems darker than i remember and her hair a little bit longer. they said that was just the ultra violent treatment, so she thought nothing of it. as time went on it became apparent that her daughter did not look like her. she was much, much darker. then her husband started getting suspicious. it became clear she was suspected of cheating on her husband, if not her husband, people around her. they decided to take a dna test. that's when it was established. she wasn't her daughter. then of course procedures kicked in and an investigation kicked in. there was a terrible swapping over and they brought her up as their own, but she was another couple's child. that other couple had their daughter.
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so it was extremely distressing moment for them. they have, in the meantime the two couples have tried to get together and see if they can establish some kind of relationship, if you like. it hasn't worked out. you can imagine why. it must be the most stressing and bewildering thing for everyone concerned. >> do you know anything about the other family involved? >> not really. this is the family going public. the other couple they have associated themselves with the lawsuit. they have stayed in touch. they took the suit. the daughter is darker. now, all the latest business news, shall we? aaron is here with you. a war on diesel.
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>> european war. do you have a diesel car? >> no. >> i do. i'll explain why. thanks alice. one of the most polluted cities in europe now paris is trying to lose that title. the mayor of the french capitol wants to ban diesel from the city. she wants them out in 2020 to lower air pollution. in july they won't be allowed in assume thg is a success, diesel vehicles may be next on the hit list. paris isn't the only city trying to crack down. london and norway are looking at proposals. in business, we are going to take a closer look to what the bans may mean. they told us to buy diesel didn't they? ten years or so ago. buy diesel. now they are reversing that. more on gmt and european car
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makers who make diesel vehicles. the price of oil is poised for a relatively swift recovery following the recent collapse under 50 bucks a barrel according to the international energy agency. the power space agency made it clear they will not see a return to record high prices. they added that unlike past cycles where we see a price drop the price is not expected to greatly boost economic output. low demand was part of the reason for the market drop. we are going to have more on that on gmt in just over an hour's time. i can't say that enough. music streaming is the way ahead. music lovers around the world listen to this streamed 146 billion songs on to their computers, tablets and smartphones. that is double. twice the amount in 2013. despite the speed the industry
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is growing are they making money out of it? last year at&t decided to quit the business. sony will soon follow. find out on gmt in just over an hour time. tweet me at bbc. are you a streamer? >> i am. i had no idea you were so passionate. >> not passionate, just the market value is going to go off the cliff. >> leave it there. thank you. still to come an invasion of privacy. an app that allows moms and dads to check up on their children. oners who seek more than just a little time off. the ones who choose to go big or stay home. ♪ come with me now ♪ where every amazing, despicable wizarding adventure
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in an exclusive interview, president assad told the bbc his government is receiving messages on the uss coalition battling the islamic state. malaysia's opposition leader is on his way to serve a five year sentence after the highest court dismissed his appeal and upheld the decision for gay sex. our correspondent is at the court. i spoke to him a short while ago. >> supporters believe he's politically motivated charges. he had sodomy and corruption charges filed against him when he was forced from power. in 1998 he spent six years in prison. eventually, the charges were overthrown and he was free from jail and returned to politics. he brought the opposition
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movement together to become the most creditable threat yet. winning the popular vote for another majority. the charges first brought up in 2008 were after a series of courts confirmed by five federal court judges in the building behind me. that prompted anger with supporters. we have seen him taken up at the age of 67 in a police van, a prison van to serve a five-year sentence in jail. that many people would say counts the question of whether he has anymore political future given his age. >> let's turn to the top story and the exclusive interview with president assad. in a moment we'll speak with the opposition syrian coalition. first, let's get an overview of
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the situation on the ground. more than 9 million syrians have been forced from their homes in the country's major cities. president assad's forces control most of the west following battles in damascus and homs. islamic state militants who controlled much of iraq have taken territory to the east and around kabani. we are now joined in us tan ball from the syrian coalition. we were just looking at a map detailing the current situation on the ground in syria. we heard from president assad earlier telling jeremy syria is not a failed state. when we look at the map, he is clearly not in control of syria,
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but neither are you. is syria a failed state? >> at this point, control 28% of the land. if you look at the state of -- a very dire story. we are talking the industries going from bankruptcy last year by the end of 2014 except for the tobacco industry. unemployment rate is 17%. the death for syria prior to the revolution was $8 billion. now, to maintain his rule over the country, his grip he had to borrow close to $35 billion. even in the areas that he controls or so he claims he doesn't have actual command or controlled structures over the militias from lebanon, iraq afghanistan and iran. really we are going to very
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dangerous slippery slope where he does not have control, the state is failing. he continues to kill more and more civilians. the numbers are scary. >> what do you make of the other points of president assad. he denied dropping barrel bombs and called the accusations childish and admitted to receiving information from the u.s. led coalition. he admitted receiving such information. what do you make of all that? >> we are talking somebody that is disconnected from reality. we are talking about thousands and thousands of videos showing barrel bombs. some are as large as humongous dumpsters dumped on civilians. anywhere from 7,000 to 9,000 barrel bombs have been dropped. when he say that is never happened, he's either lying or not aware of what's going on in
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syria. i think he was saying something that was very clear to us. the reality of the u.s. not having direct communication with assad, but the international coalition sends messages. the iraqi government for example, telling us they are targeting an area. if you are on the ground and lock against our airplanes, we will crush your airport. that's the kind of message they are receiving. they are insulting. we are going to do whatever we want. you need to make sure you do not interfere with the mission. he was running away from the fact that it's not a direct message. there's general messaging. he cannot admit to the content of the messages. >> we have to leave it there. many thanks for joining us there. live from istanbul. most young people sfend a lot of time on their smartphones, don't they? parents could use it to your
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advantage. a new app allows remote access to everything they install on their phone or tablet. >> breakfast. cereal a quick chat and katie gets her bag packed. at home her mom checks while katie is online. out the door there's nothing she can do. >> it would be a good idea if i could get access into just monitor, not on a daily basis, but every couple days or something. >> reporter: this is going to allow you to know when something bad happens in your child's life. >> enter chris. he's launching a new app giving remote access to everything a child does on their phone. a built-in alert system affecting every website and each
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message, tracking your child's movement. so in theory gayle could watch katie from her front door to the classroom itself. >> you are with "bbc world news." thanks for watching. you pay your auto insurance premium every month on the dot. you're like the poster child for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it? hey insurance companies, news flash.
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welcome back to "bbc world news." our top stories. in our exclusive interview, president assad tells the bbc his government has information from the americans in the war against islamic state. >> there's no formation. >> they tell you things? do you tell them things? >> no. >> he heads for a stunning victory in state elections in delhi and a set back for the prime minister. a hong kong woman is found
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guilty of starving and beating her indonesian maid in a case that sparked international outrage. a warm welcome to you. we begin in syria. president assad insisted his country is not a failed state. speaking exclusively to the bbc, he admitted his government is receiving communication from the u.s. led coalition against the so-called islamic state. he bears no responsibility to the humanitarian crisis engulfing parts of his country as they enter their fifth year. an estimated 200,000 people lost their lives. more than 9 million forced from their homes, many to refugee camps in neighboring countries.
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well documented evidence as barrel bombs have been dropped on rebel held areas. in an interview, president assad denies uses forces. many of syria's major cities including homes have been reduced to ruins. president al assad was speaking to bbc at the presidential palace in damascus. >> mr. president, you have lost control of large areas of syria. the jihadist group, islamic state emerged. 200,000 syrians are dead, many lost their homes. they call it the most serious humanitarian crisis since the second world war. has syria become a failed state? >> no, as long as the government and state are fulfilling the need for the syrian people cannot talk failure states. talking about losing control is
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something completely different. it's like if you have invasion of terrorists coming from abroad and the government is doing the job and fighting and defending its country. >> i have spent time on the front line with soldiers from the syrian army who insisted they were patriots. they weren't cold-blooded killers. i have interviewed other people and they say they have suffered badly at the hand of syrian soldiers. they can't all have been lying, surely. >> how? how surely? why are you sure? >> because the testimony of human rights. january of this year, they said forces have deliberately and viciously attacked civilians
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using weapons, notoriously barrel bombs. >> this is childish. >> childish? >> why? >> somebody against these people and against the region of power and the great power in the west. and survive. >> what about barrel bombs? you don't deny your forces use them? >> i know about the army use bullets and bombs. i haven't heard of them using barrels. >> large barrels full of explosives and projectiles that are dropped from helicopters and explode with devastating effect. >> we have bombs, missiles and bullets. >> you wouldn't deny are these barrel bombs, which are indiscriminate weapons? >> no. when you shoot you aim. when you aim, you aim at terrorists in order to protect civilians. again, if you are talking
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casualty it's war. you will have casualties. >> on the fight against islamic state and al qaeda, the u.s. and others said you cannot be a partner in that fight. would you like to be a partner? >> partner with who? >> partner with the countries attacking the islamic state at the moment. >> definitely cannot. we cannot be aligned with a country that supports terrorism. >> do you talk to the americans? there are american planes in the air above syria all the time. do you coordinate? >> no. they don't talk to anyone. and they trumpet over the international law about our sovereignty now. they don't talk to us. we don't talk to them. >> i'm curious, is there a time when the american military is in the air above syria and your air force, the syrian air force is in the air above syria, but there haven't been any incidents between the two. no shot seems to have been
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traded. no planes shot down. that suggests to me surely -- >> that's correct. that's correct. again, there's no direct cooperation. >> direct. is it by iraq? that's what some said? >> through third party. more than one party. like in other countries. sometimes they contain a message. nothing tactical. >> they tell you, we are going to bomb at 10:00, please get out of the way. >> before it started, we didn't know about it. >> a continuing dialogue with third parties? >> there's no dialogue. there's formation, but not dialogue. >> they tell you things? >> some. >> do you tell them things? >> no. we do something in our territory, we don't ask anyone or tell anyone. >> we'll talk about the
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humanitarians in a minute. one of the effective military tactics the syrian army uses is to isolate areas. that has had the effect of starving civilians and that again, is against the laws of war, starving civilians. >> that's not correction. much of the area where the rebels take over the civilians come to our area. very simply. not all the areas we attack are only filled with militants. >> they may have come to your area not because they want to come but because their areas are heavily bombed. i have been in damascus a contrast to the center. there are rebels 20 meters high and no other people -- >> that's not realistic. the natural reaction of any person of the people of the families of the population is to flee from any area where they expect a conflict.
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that's why they flee the area. they expect fighting with the army. they come to the government. >> what keeps you awake at night? >> what keeps me awake at night? anything that could affect humans. life. could be personal. could be work. >> your job? >> could be. i'm a human. what could any human be affected by? >> a lot of what president assad said will be controversial, especially among his enemies. they have written him off many times. but, he's still in office and looking as secure as at anytime since the war started. >> we have a reporter who met president assad several times gave me her assessment. >> following the interviews he's
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done it's not surprising he came across as confident. like you said he is as secure as ever probably more secure than any time. this is the time for him to come out and speak to the world, i told you from the beginning, this is you know al qaeda, this is extremism. have the influence, extremism inside syria that i am the guardian of syria. what you can hear from the words is denial denial and then denial. that's the status he's been following from day one. there's no apprising, no protests. he's denying the barrel bomb that is the whole world is watching and seeing. >> calling the accusations childish.
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do these mannerisms and responses surprise you? is that characteristic? >> it's part of his character when talking to the public to give examples and lectures and mock other countries that are -- he's not in agreements with. but, i have to say, it was like also something from his first speech, at the beginning of the up risal that people wanted a moment of silence for the martyrs and he denied the people. also he's coming saying i'm the one protecting the country, the country being bombarded by his own forces a country where more than 11 million lost their homes. 3 million refugees. that's certainly not the role of terrorism that pushed them out of their homes. >> you have met him several times, worked in the country. you were last there in november. how would you describe the
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public support for assad within syria? >> the situation is completely changing. yes, definitely, there are loyalists of president assad who have the interest in staying with him. economic interests or even political interests. for the vast majorities, those loyalists who are not the majority of the civilian population, there is a complete change in shift. they have lost a lot. lots of people being killed. they have lost their homes there as well. they are afraid of extremism. in many cases, forces are failing to protect the minorities. in fact the militias that are established to support, the national defense forces trained by iran. they are launching against his loyalists. he's losing support among loyalists as well.
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now india's prime minister got a heavy defeat in new delhi. the anticorruption campaign has been through a landslide victory. our correspondent is in delhi where supporters are celebrating. >> reporter: there's nowhere in the city you can feel this more than where i am now, which is of course just outside the headquarters of the party. the prominent man, the big tv screen behind me and the numbers keep flashing up on the screen. if it continues this way, the party would have won almost every single seat up for grabs. even they can't quite comprehend the scale of the victory. the leader spoke with supporters a short while ago and described the mandate as a scary one. just eight months ago, they won
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every parliament seat in new delhi. he was seen as a man that can get things done. eight months voters think he has has it act together. they have shown him how unforgiving they can be. >> these elections could mark a major comeback for him and his anti-corruption ap party. >> reporter: it is. it's a stunning comeback. he was at the head of a major anticorruption drive a few years ago. over a year ago, after the last election, he formed the minority government in new delhi. he left after 49 days. he was seen as widely discredited. he held protests outside the offices of the federal government building. he went head-to-head against the parliamentary election and was defeated quite soundly. a few weeks ago, no one would
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have imagined such a turn around. he was poised not just to win, but a historic and decisive victory. >> now, a hong kong woman has been found guilty of brutally abusing her indonesian maid. during the trial, the court heard that she starved and beat the maid. we have been following the case and the abused maid was speaking at a news conference there. >> calling for a maximum punishment of life sentence for her former boss. she says that if she gets a life sentence, it will be more comfortable than the abuse she was subjected to. she never shows remorse for what she did. to the indonesian government
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she is asking for her and millions of other indonesian women for better protection for workers abroad. this case highlights the vol vulnerability of workers in people's homes. many do not come out, they are afraid to report it. still to come, the line for social revolution. the afghan women charging tradition. ♪ go! go! go! he's challenging the very fabric of society. in a post cannonball world! was it grilled cheese? guilty! the aquatic delinquency is a larger issue to this ♪ you did it again, didn't you? yup. ♪
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the latest headlines. in our exclusive interview, syria's president assad told the bbc his government is receiving indirect messages from the u.s. led coalition battling islamics. anticorruption party is heading for a victory in state
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elections in delhi. in a major setback to the parliament there. the opposition leader is on his way to britain to serve a five-year sentence after the country's highest court dismissed his appeal and upheld his conviction. we are at the court. >> supporters and most human rights groups believe they are politically moteivated charges. he had sodomy charges filed against him when he was forced from power. he was disgraced in 1998. he spend six years in prison. eventually, the charges were overthrown and he was freed from jail. he brought the opposition party together and became the biggest threat for a party that's held on to power. they came close in the last
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election winning the popular vote and the majority. now, these charges, which were first brought up in 2008 were after being confirmed by five federal court judges in the building behind me. that prompted anger against supporters. after the age of 67 in a police ban to serve a five-year sentence in jail. that many people would say cast a question over whether he has a political future given his age and he faces an automatic five-year ban from holding office because of his sentence. >> remind us who this man is jonathan. as you say, supporters argue this is a politically motivated case. he's a popular politician in power over 20 years. who is he? >> reporter: a clever man. he was a rising star within the governing party in the 1990s,
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rising up to become prime minister and finance minister. he fell out with his mentor and was purged from power. the charges against him. he spent six years in prison. when he emerged, he was the most charismatic politician we have seen. this is a country dominated by the governing party. because of its long tenure in power, a tight relationship in the party and gives enormous advantages. hard for the opposition to get ground. through his charisma brought together opposition parties into a coalition that's attracted growing amounts of support. malaysia's big minorities and numbers of middle class malaysians here in the city. for that reason he's a threat to the governing party. many argue that is the reason he's gone back to jail.
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let's bring you other news now. two french families whose babies were switched at birth almost 20 years ago have been awarded composition. they were put in the incubator together. ten years later, discovered she and her husband were not the biological parents of their daughter. an investigation was handled and the other couples were traced. studying the center of the earth think they know what the inner core is made up of. the research teams in china and the u.s. studied seismic waves and observed how they change as they travel through different layers of the planet. it's made of of two separate distinctive parts. the rebels in yemen announced they have fully taken over the country. they di-ssolved the parliament.
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they will elect a five member presidential counsel. they warned the country is on the brink of dissolve if instability continues. we have the report. >> reporter: besieged by public struggling to survive. she comes to this public yard every day to do the laundry. she has no water at home. >> translator: our landlord cut the water off. he wanted us to pay 20 extra dollars a month, but we couldn't afford it. >> reporter: this is not a remote or rural area it's in the heart of the capitol. mothers worry for their children's future, if things do not take a turn for the better. in another part of town i met a woman who lives with her husband
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and five children. they came from the countryside looking for a comfortable life. they found nothing but dispair. >> translator: i worry when my children go to school because of the trouble on the streets. it's scary. >> reporter: this is a residential area with no access to basic needs. there are many other places like this all over. the people here find this difficult to get by on a daily basis. for a decade yemen has been suffering from poverty. more than half of the population is in need of aid according to statistics. political instability adds to the miz ray. they fear if the humanitarian situation were to continue a lot of lives could be put at risk. local charities are trying to help. their resources are limited and the demand is huge.
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>> translator: the people desperately need food and medication because of the dire economic situation. the government is unable to provide them with services. >> reporter: we joined them on one of their distribution trips. the neighborhood looks more like a refugee camp. families of seven or eight members are crammed into two rooms. >> translator: we barely have money for food gas and water. i can't provide my children with all their needs. >> reporter: while insecurity grips the country, it is these vulnerable people that feel the most abandoned. bbc news. a group of young women in afghanistan challenging the stereo type of the nation training to compete in cycle
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races. we joined the ladies as they prepare to set out. >> reporter: a group of young women share a breakfast of bread, jam and cream cheese. behind the veils and modest dress, they are overturning preconceptions about what is possible for women here. afghanistan's only professional cyclist gives the national women's team a pep talk. every one of these cyclists had to argue with brothers fathers, uncles to join the team. cycling in public remains scandalous for the majority of people in afghanistan who follow traditional codes of behavior. the coach was threatened and once beaten up but carries on. >> translator: these girls can flag the afghanistan flag. afghanistan should not be seen
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only as champions in drugs, but in sport as well. we can compete with the bust countries in the world. >> reporter: the cycles are nothing like the tailor made machinery by western teams. what they lack in equipment, they make up for in enthusiasm. they are getting fit. competing in pakistan and bangladesh. they don't expect to be world champions. it's the taking part that counts. there are always new recruits learning a sport from scratch. careers tend to be short in a country where many are married by the age of 20 and drop out of the team. >> i want to keep cycling because i want to become -- we want to become afghanistan's heroes one day. >> reporter: for those who dare to dream of a different afghanistan from the one torn apart by war, a social revolution is rolling out of the
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first comes...getting it a little wrong. love does not come first. first comes like. hello, you are watching gmt on "bbc world news." i'm david eades. the top story, what president assad does know and doesn't know about the war in his own country. in an interview, they deny the use of barrel bombs and says the u.s. led coalition passes on information about the conflict with islamic state. >> >> they tell you things?

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